chris-miller-and-family.resized Jana, Joseph, Carson, and Chris Miller

Chris Miller lives in Katy, Texas, with his wife, Jana, and two sons, Joseph (12) and Carson (8). Chris tells AotS about his family’s first cruise with Autism on the Seas and how he became inspired to start Autism Anywhere, a Youtube channel that offers travel tips and advice to families with special needs children. Chris features first-hand experience by sharing his own family’s vacation adventures with their special needs son, Joseph.

According to Chris, Joseph’s autism is quite severe. He's mostly nonverbal, but has some echolalia, where he'll repeat things from TV shows, etc. Chris says, barring the occasional meltdown, Joseph's a great kid.

LISTEN to our podcast interview with Chris Miller, AotS cruiser and vlogger at AutismAnywhere.com



AotS:     Tell us about your new YouTube channel and soon to come website, Autism Anywhere. Is your mission to share your family's experiences so other special needs families can overcome their apprehensions about travel?

Chris Miller:        Exactly. We're big proponents of getting out with your child. We know lots of people who have kids on the spectrum and they have become virtual shut-ins. They never get out, they don't think they can go out to dinner, they don't think they can go anywhere. We believe, the more you get out, the more you take your kids out and let them experience things, the better they'll be able to cope with life. We just want to share the tips and tricks that we've figured out along the way and just share our experiences going to new places, such as the Autism on the Seas cruise.

AotS:     Okay. Tell us a little bit about how that all played out. How did you decide on an AotS cruise for your first time?

CM:        Well, first off, we live close to Galveston, which is the port we departed from. A couple of years ago, we participated in an Autism on the Seas ship tour, which is designed for families like us who have never cruised with their special needs child before. We were able to go on board, meet some of the volunteers that were available at that time. We just got a good feel for how things were handled, got to meet people, and realized, hey, this is something we can do!

So, we finally got together and thought, "Okay, let's just go ahead and do this." We booked the cruise, and when we did that, we started researching heavily into what we would need to bring, and so forth. One thing we always do before any trip is just start watching YouTube videos on everything. We're big fans of YouTube, obviously.

We made sure to watch it with both of our boys so they could see what the ship looks like. There are lots of virtual ship tours, so we searched specifically for Royal Caribbean’s Vision of the Seas, which was the ship we were sailing on. We just watched those videos repeatedly for a long while. Then, around that time, we decided, you know what, it would be nice to have videos of our experience on an Autism on the Seas cruise. So we thought, "Okay, let's just do it." We'd been toying with the idea of developing a vlog, and the cruise was the perfect opportunity to get us started.

AotS:     How was Joseph's experience? How did he interact with the staff?

CM:        Everything was excellent. The only issues were fairly typical with Joseph needing to adjust to sleeping in a new place. The first few nights he settled down and got to bed a little later than usual. But the staff was excellent. Fortunately, the way it's structured is, you meet the staff a couple of times before you drop off for respite,  so Joseph got to know a few of the volunteers at the sail-away party. They also do a private one-on-one meeting, so we were able to get to know each other and he was able to get comfortable. It was a very smooth experience all across the board.

AotS:     Did you take full advantage of the respite?

CM:        Every time it was available, we took good advantage of it. We know that it's a rare thing to come by in the autism community. There were lots of shows and activities on the ship. There are always at least 10 things to do on a cruise. In fact,  we did a wrap-up and we were discussing that maybe next time we do a cruise we might want to schedule some naps, because there's just so much stuff to do that you can just go, go, go, go.

AotS:     It’s great that you could enjoy being carefree for a little bit and reconnect with your wife and your younger typical son, Carson, yes?

CM:        Yes. Oh, Carson enjoyed respite, too. He went in with his brother to the respite times more often than not. There were a couple of instances where we took him to a show that Joseph wouldn't find interesting, but he loved it. He was actually asking, "Hey, when's respite?" and one of the occasions was at a beach. You can't beat that?!

AotS:     How did Joseph do with the scheduled private activities for AotS cruisers?

CM:        Joseph actually got up a few inches on the rock climbing wall, but they certainly didn't pressure him. He got the straps on and so forth, the protective gear, and he would just kind of walk up to the wall, look at it, and get his feet on the first one, and then back off and then look at it. That was a good experience, because since they had a dedicated time for just us families, he was able to do it at his pace. There weren’t people breathing down our necks like, "Come on, hurry up."

Oh, and swimming. He loves swimming, so that was great to have that available. We did that every sea day. They had a swimming time planned with staff. It was nice, because normally my wife or I have to be with him 24/7, and so the staff was able to swim around with him, as well. That took some of the pressure off. He loves swimming, so that was something he really enjoyed.

AotS:     Before we let you go, give us a few of your tips. If you were going to advise a fellow traveler and parent in your situation, how would you tell them to prepare?

CM:        I would say you know your kid better than anyone. One thing, when you're in the autism world, you become an expert on your own child. So make sure that you have the items that they need to calm down and such, because when we would have some downtime in the room, he would go to his iPad or we would bring dot to dot books, because he likes crafts and activities and coloring. There were times that we would bring some of his own items to the respite and drop those off with him, just in case he didn't like the activities there. That way, they had a backup if something was wrong. That helps.

We brought some items just to make the cruise room a little bit more like home, like certain things from the bathroom and certain stuffed animals and things like that, just to help ease the transition. That helped, too. Just be prepared, essentially. Make sure you have backup batteries for iPads!

The other thing we did in preparation for the cruise was to create something of a social story by using those Youtube videos. It certainly helped Joseph to see the ship, see what the rooms looked like, etc. I do recommend that people start as early as possible. I see people in the typical world do things, like surprise vacations, where it’s like, "Hey, we're going to Disney World!" For kids on the spectrum, that's not something you want to do. You want to, the second you know that you're going, start working the thought into everyday conversation.

AotS:     So, are you going to cruise with us again?

CM:        Yes, definitely. We're going on an AotS cruise to Key West and CocoCay next summer.